OUR RESEARCH HAS BEEN PUBLISHED IN LEADING SURGICAL AND NURSING JOURNALS AND BOOKS.

Korkiakangas, T. (2016). Mobilising a team for the WHO Surgical Checklist: A qualitative video study. BMJ Quality and Safety.

Korkiakangas, Weldon, Bezemer & Kneebone (2016). "Coming up!": Why verbal acknowledgement matters in the operating theatre. In S. White & J. Cartmill (Eds.) Communication in Surgical Practice, Equinox Publishing.

Bezemer, Korkiakangas, Weldon, Kress & Kneebone (2016). Unsettled teamwork: Communication and learning in the operating theatres of an urban hospital. Journal of Advanced Nursing 72(2), 361-72.

Weldon S-M., Korkiakangas T., Bezemer J. & Kneebone R. (2015). Music and communication in the operating theatre. Journal of Advanced Nursing 71(12), 2763–2774.

Korkiakangas, Weldon, Bezemer & Kneebone (2015). Video-Supported Simulation for Interactions in the Operating Theatre (ViSIOT). Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 11(4), 203-207.

Korkiakangas, Weldon, Bezemer & Kneebone (2014). Nurse–surgeon object transfer: Video analysis of communication and situation awareness in the operating theatre. International Journal of Nursing Studies 51(9), 1195-1206.

Weldon, Korkiakangas, Bezemer & Kneebone (2013). Communication in the operating theatre. British Journal of Surgery 100(13), 1677-1688.

Music is played in 53-72% of surgical operations performed. Noise levels in the operating theatre already exceed World Health Organisation recommendations. A chi-square test revealed that repeated requests were five times more likely to occur in cases that played music than those that did not. A repeated request can add 4-68 seconds each to operation time and increased tensions due to frustration at ineffective communication. Music played in the operating theatre can interfere with team communication, yet is seldom recognized as a potential safety hazard.


Weldon, Korkiakangas, Bezemer & Kneebone (2015). Music and communication in the operating theatre. Journal of Advanced Nursing 71(12), 2763–2774.

What one clinician knows, or does not know – their situational awareness – can depend on physical positioning in the theatre and whether they see what a colleague is doing. Verbal acknowledgements, such as “Yes coming!” were voiced so as to notify the surgeon what was “going on”. These responses showed nurses’ orientation to the surgeon’s separate and often limited perspective by the operating table and established mutual awareness of the situation-at-hand.


- Korkiakangas, Weldon, Bezemer & Kneebone (2016). "Coming up!": Why verbal acknowledgement matters in the operating theatre. In Communication in Surgical Practice, Equinox.

One of the most central collaborative tasks during surgical operations is the passing of objects, including instruments. The smoothness of object transfer can be improved by adjusting the scrub nurse's instrument trolley position, enabling a better monitoring of surgeon's bodily conduct and affording early orientation (awareness) to an upcoming request (changing situation).  A simple intervention to highlight the significance of these factors could improve communication in the operating theatre.


- Korkiakangas, Weldon, Bezemer & Kneebone (2014). Nurse–surgeon object transfer: Video analysis of communication and situation awareness in the operating theatre. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 51(9), 1195-1206.

Increasingly, health care professionals step in and out of newly formed transient teams and work with colleagues they have not met before, unsettling previously relatively stable team work based on shared, local knowledge accumulated over significant periods of close collaboration. Instances where difficulties arose in the communication between scrub nurse and surgeons were identified and subjected to detailed, interactional analysis. Instrument requests frequently prompted clarification from the scrub nurse (e.g. “Sorry, what did you want?”). Such requests were either followed by a relatively elaborate clarification, designed to maximise learning opportunities, or a by a relatively minimal clarification, designed to achieve the immediate task at hand. Significant variation exists in the degree of support given to scrub nurses requesting clarification. Some surgeons experience such requests as disruptions, while others treat them as opportunities to build shared knowledge. 

 

- Bezemer, Korkiakangas, Weldon & Kneebone (2016). Unsettled teamwork: Communication and learning in the operating theatres of an urban hospital. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 72(2), 361-72. 

The students who participated in the simulation provided feedback in an informal discussion. Grounding the model in authentic rather than hypothetical examples was highly valued, as everyday communication is often taken for granted. New strategies were particularly welcomed, as students expressed concerns about showing their difficulties to a busy surgeon and feeling nervous when faced with unfamiliar terminology and new instruments. Responding verbally to colleagues and addressing loud music were also recognised as important. A mental framework, ‘‘We are here for the patient,’’ was proposed so as to encourage speaking up when feeling timid about doing so.

 

- Korkiakangas, Weldon, Bezemer & Kneebone (2015). Video-Supported Simulation for Interactions in the Operating Theatre (ViSIOT). Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 11(4), 203-207.

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